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20120929
20120929
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CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 5:15pm EDT
about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house pre ♪ >> this is book tv's live coverage of the national books s festival
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 4:30pm EDT
program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he not only knows all the levers to pull but has the will. in lyndon johnson's case almost vicious drive to do it, to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i do the research look what he is doing. look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i tried to explain that in my books. to me, to see him doing that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory given true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books on lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand times already as the case in the centerpiece of this book, the assassination of presid
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 10:15am EDT
secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendments and other developments. who is this we? when did folks like you when i become part of this? >> well, obviou
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 11:45am EDT
in the civil rights movement. others had been working in the movement, and albany since 61. this was 65. nay had -- they had also stard the movement in several other coupes in the area, and i tease him now because the gater had the worst reputation, and he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there, but once my father, who was a leader in the community, was murdered, that was the one thing that really brought everyone together, and they were ready for it when they came in to help us start the baker county movement. >> wow. what's interesting to me is you really -- in the book, you really write about the way the legacy of trauma impacts you as a family so that even though we all know the landmark case, brown versus board of education, but you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children who went to the white school lost all their black friends, couldn't make white friends, and found themselves living in no man's land. i don't think we have the chance to really feel the price that those young folk paid in order for us to be where we are that we get t
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 3:30pm EDT
, but it's a pretty dangerous place to be. we need -- we need to have that conversation, the civil rights issue of the 21st century are that, race and poverty, and, of course, education is, indeed, governor romney said it the other day, i had to look at the notes to see i had it right, and the criminal justice system because in addition to the discrimination that violates the law, job discrimination, discrimination in housing and housing finance and so on, we have what we all know in terms of the structural, institutional discrimination of how our schools ordinary reason and opee systemmings and michelle alexander and the new jim crow, published by the new press, has made so clear how our criminal justice system operates. now, that's the basic set of things that we talk about in the book. i also talk, and i won't go into it in great length here, but about poverty in relation to place. our inner cities, app -- appalachia, colonial south texas, all of that because that's where we have the persistent poverty where we have the intergenerational poverty, and it -- i found it very interesting.
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 7:00am EDT
. that is not good enough. i will look at the back to school bus for and went to topeka, kansas. this is the civil-rights issue of our generation. i am convinced it is not race or class but education and opportunity. if we're serious about closing the achievement gap we have to close the opportunity get. we have had nothing here the sense of urgency and commitment to closing those opportunity gaps that we need to. in brown vs. board five decades ago to look at the staggering inequities, inequality of opportunity by any measure we have to get better faster. all those things compel us to act. the president provided extraordinary leadership and understands what is at stake. congress's current assumption is supportive and we have to look at this together with politics and ideology aside. we have to educate our way to a better economy and vienna different place. how do we get there? a pretty compelling case that that is the best investment we can make. if we put our three and four-year-olds into kindergarten, we start to close the achievement gaps and close the opportunity get. if we don't do that we are cons
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 7:00pm EDT
refused to turn over records to a judge. civil contempt. and you could be imprisoned far longer on civil contempt and criminal because you do not have the right to appeal or to have a lawyer. no rights as in a criminal case. there are things of the system people are not aware of. average people like you and me. >> host: is it just the state? what about corporations or searches on the internet zero word behavior's or cellphones or all that information that is out there? >> of course, i am concerned with the ordinary citizen be a criminal probe i have a hard time drawing a line i a doubt they could exist unless they had state privilege or limited liability or syndication by the state i am not slamming big business it should get as big as it can in a free-market contest. led a flourish and prosper. but yes everyone will go after my data because they can make money off of it. as long as i have the ability to say no all are shut the door which the state does not let me do but i do with the free-market, then it is up to me. but slammed the door and say mind your own goddamn business. [laughter
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 11:00pm EDT
, yemen is expressed their will in providing or in niending -- finding a solution or avoiding the civil war, and, therefore, yes, yemen voted yes for a peaceful state. civil state, mod enstate, that is based on rule of law and respect of the rights of which allow us to get into the second phase and to implement what's left of the political solution and get the yemen out of the bottleneck and to make it less safely, and we have law -- draft law of the transition that will assist in solving all the bloodshed and all the conflicts, and we still in need of the political and economic assistance that we'll help -- will help us a lot in implementing all the other segments of the gulf initiative, and this is why the yemen people are looking for. we got tired of conflicts of wars, and now and through the national dialogue that we are preparing for in order to get this dialogue as soon as possible so we will have a blueprint of a prosperous yemeni based on future freedom and equality and through good governess by reforming the administration and combat corruption and focus on development, and we
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 12:45pm EDT
or the way it has to be done in the civil way, i think this has to be checked, but we cannot launch a war on the terms that we have now so it's not acceptable for anyone, but at the same time, the right that we are giving to some, we should also ask ourselves why there is a lack of consistency in our policies in the region, and this kind of demonization of iran is not helping the region to find solutions so this is one. the second is about what is happening in e just a -- egypt and in -- what was the point you were making was -- >> [inaudible] >> yes, what is happening, the attack against the american embassy, and this that, of course, it's going to be used by the media. it's going to be once again used by people saying, luxe, -- look, even now, what we said about the uprising, ends up with people against the west. inside, it was very much positive in the whole process over the months of the uprisings is new slogans against the west, new slogans against the united states or european country. it was mubarak and e regime, nothing against the west. it was powerful. it was internal talk and s
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9